April 2021 #NCTEchat: Celebrating 25 Years of Children’s Day, Book Day

Join us on Sunday, April 18, at 8:00 p.m. ET for an #NCTEchat where we celebrate the 25th anniversary of Children’s Day, Book Day. 
Founded by author and poet Pat Mora, Children’s Day, Book Day is a year-long commitment celebrating the importance of bookjoy. It was inspired by the Mexican traditional holiday El día del niño (the day of the child). Mora thought, “We have Mother’s Day and Father’s Day. We need kids’ day too, but I want to connect all children with bookjoy, the pleasure of reading.”
NCTE members Denise Dávila (@ddavila_atx) and Tracey Flores (@traceyhabla) will host the chat.
We will share the following questions during the Twitter chat:
WARM-UP: Please introduce yourself by telling us your location and role. Share a photo of a text that brought you #bookjoy as a child or teen. #NCTEchat [8:04 p.m.]
Q1: Children’s Day, Book Day is April 30. Have you celebrated this day in the past? If so, what tips can you offer to those planning a Children’s Day, Book Day #bookjoy celebration (virtually or in person)? If not, what ideas do you have for future celebrations? #NCTEchat [8:10 p.m.]
Q2: Children’s Day, Book Day is often called Día to emphasize the importance of daily reading. How do you foster #bookjoy every day? #NCTEchat [8:18 p.m.]
Q3: How do you engage families and communities in promoting a love of reading? #NCTEchat [8:26 p.m.]
Q4: What strategies do you have for sharing readings and incorporating storytelling in our current digital environment? #NCTEchat [8:34 p.m.]
Q5: What professional texts have you been reading that correspond with #bookjoy? #NCTEchat  [8:42 p.m.]
Q6: Share any book that you have recently read and/or are currently reading and why you would recommend it to others. #bookjoy #NCTEchat [8:50 p.m.]
We hope to see you there! Be sure to join us by using #NCTEchat.
Never participated in a Twitter chat before? Check out this guide to help you get started.

Webinar: Teacher Mental Health In The Elementary Classroom

Webinar Event: April 14 at 9 a.m. Eastern U.S. Seating is limited so register now. Title: Teacher Mental Health: Proactive Remedies For The Elementary Classroom Teacher Register Now Date: April 14 at 9 a.m. Eastern US Presenter: Donald Perras, Ph.D Duration: 60 mins Cost: Free Topics: Teacher mental health manifestations, internal and external mental health … Read more

National Library Week 2021

National Library Week begins today and spans April 4–10, 2021. The theme for National Library Week 2021 is “Welcome to Your Library” and promotes the idea that libraries extend far beyond the four walls of a building—and that everyone is welcome to use their services.
During the pandemic, libraries have been going above and beyond to adapt to the changing world by expanding their resources and continuing to meet the needs of their users. Whether patrons visit in person or virtually, libraries offer opportunities for everyone to explore new worlds and become their best selves through access to technology, multimedia content, and educational programs.
How can you celebrate National Library Week?

Use the library’s online resources: The online services that libraries have made readily available allow users to continue supporting libraries.
Support your local library on social media: If you can’t make it to your library, visit their website or social media pages to learn about programs and services offered.
Reread your favorite books: Inventory the books you have access to and reread a beloved text. If you’ve got so many you can’t keep track, consider an app that lets you keep track and share your favorite reads, like Goodreads, LibraryThing, or Litsy. 
Running out of space in your home bookshelves? Use your library as a resource for browsing and sampling new books before you commit to adding them to your personal library.

How do you plan to celebrate National Library Week?
It is the policy of NCTE in all publications, including the Literacy & NCTE blog, to provide a forum for the open discussion of ideas concerning the content and the teaching of English and the language arts. Publicity accorded to any particular point of view does not imply endorsement by the Executive Committee, the Board of Directors, the staff, or the membership at large, except in announcements of policy, where such endorsement is clearly specified.

March 2021 #NCTEchat: Tooling a “Good Generation” as 21st-Century Problem Solvers

Join us on Sunday, March 21, at 8:00 p.m. ET for an #NCTEchat about creating a “Good Generation” as 21st-century problem solvers, hosted by members of the NCTE Standing Committee on Global Citizenship.
Special thanks to committee members Mary Fahrenbruck @Marylovesbooks3, Danielle Filipiak @flipster33, Kylowna Moton @EnglishMajorRu1, and Michael Seward @unreconstituted.
The March #NCTEchat was inspired by a conversation with policy advisor Simon Anholt @SimonAnholt last month. Read more at https://ncte.org/rsvp-simon-anholt/. 
We will share the following questions during the Twitter chat:
WARM-UP: Please introduce yourself. Tell us your name, location, and the level you teach. #NCTEchat [8:04 p.m.]
Q1: @SimonAnholt posits that education is the solution to the world’s challenges, including climate change, extremism, pollution, racism, corruption, violence, poverty, and inequality. Do you agree or disagree? Why? [8:10 p.m.]
Q2: @SimonAnholt highlights that globalization necessitates an acknowledgment that we are living in an interconnected and interdependent world. How do we invite opportunities for students to both experience and understand the power of this interconnection? Share resources. #NCTEchat [8:18 p.m.]
Q3: What are young people teaching us, right now, about what it means to be better stewards of the world? Are we creating spaces that allow their perspectives to be centered? [8:26 p.m.]
Q4: @SimonAnholt suggests that collaboration will be a central skill. How have you taught the skills of collaboration and created student experiences in the classroom to subvert the expectation that schools ought to reinforce competition at the expense of collaboration? #NCTEchat [8:34 p.m.]
Q5: What is one action educators worldwide can take up today to help create and sustain a “Good Generation?” #NCTEchat  [8:42 p.m.]
Q6: What’s one takeaway from tonight’s chat that you’re going to investigate further tomorrow? [8:50 p.m.]
We hope to see you there! Be sure to join us by using #NCTEchat.
Never participated in a Twitter chat before? Check out this guide to help you get started.

March is Women’s History Month

Since 1911, International Women’s Day has been commemorated across the world on March 8th. This is a global day celebrating the economic, political, and social achievements of women past, present, and future. Every US President has marked March as Women’s History Month since 1995.
Women’s History Month honors and celebrates the struggles and achievements of American women throughout the history of the United States. Consider integrating resources and teaching ideas for Women’s History Month from the Library of Congress, with a focus on primary sources.
“Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists” is an exhibition that highlights little-known contributions made by North American women to two popular art forms—illustration and cartooning. While these fields are traditionally dominated by men, many women have long been creating art intended for reproduction and dissemination in newspapers, periodicals, and books. Learn more in this online exhibition.
The Travel Where Women Made History website introduces current travelers and hope-to-be travelers to a wide range of historic places associated with women’s history. All of the places on this site are in national parks or are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Use the interactive StoryMaps to discover places with women’s history connections all across the country, or check out a Trip Idea and spend a day exploring. 
The blog post “Hidden Figures of Women’s History” from this featured article highlights “hidden figures” of history—women who broke barriers, accomplished great things, or led bold and fascinating lives in eras of limited opportunity for women. They include artists and athletes, reformers and rebels, explorers, journalists, and scientists.
This compilation of blog posts features primary sources on various topics and easy to implement teaching ideas.
How do you plan to recognize Women’s History Month?
Curious about the NCTE and Library of Congress connection? Through a grant announced recently by NCTE Executive Director Emily Kirkpatrick, NCTE is engaged in new ongoing work with the Library of Congress, and “will connect the ELA community with the Library of Congress to expand the use of primary sources in teaching.” Stay tuned for more throughout the year!
It is the policy of NCTE in all publications, including the Literacy & NCTE blog, to provide a forum for the open discussion of ideas concerning the content and the teaching of English and the language arts. Publicity accorded to any particular point of view does not imply endorsement by the Executive Committee, the Board of Directors, the staff, or the membership at large, except in announcements of policy, where such endorsement is clearly specified.

February 2021 #NCTEchat: Creating LGBTQ+-Affirming Classrooms and Schools

Join us on Sunday, February 21, at 8:00 p.m. ET for an #NCTEchat about creating LGBTQ+-affirming classrooms and schools. The hosts will be Cody Miller, Vanessa Perez, and LaMar Timmons-Long, all members of the NCTE Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Advisory Committee.
Cody Miller is an assistant professor of English education at SUNY Brockport. During his seven years as a high school English teacher and in his current role, he positions texts as vehicles to discuss broader sociopolitical issues in students’ lives and worlds. Cody is chair of the NCTE LGBTQ Advisory Committee. He can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter at @CodyMillerELA.
Vanessa Perez is the Technology Integration and Library Media Specialist for Clinton High School (OK). She can be reached at @vperezy on Twitter.
LaMar Timmons-Long, a member of the NCTE LGBTQ Advisory Committee, is an English teacher in New York City and an adjunct professor at Pace University’s School of Education. He is passionate about racial linguistics, antiracist education, social justice, and equity in schools concerning all students of color and LGBTQA+ youth. You can follow him on Twitter @teachltl. 
We will share the following questions during the Twitter chat:
WARM-UP: Please introduce yourself. Tell us your name, location, and the level you teach. #NCTEchat [8:04 p.m.]
Q1: As teachers, how do we honor, support, and teach Black LGBTQ+ voices during Black History Month, through the African American Read-In, and throughout the year? #NCTEchat [8:10 p.m.]
Q2: If you have a gay student alliance or other affinity group, how are they supporting each other right now? If you don’t, what would you need to start one? [8:18 p.m.]
Q3: How do you support students who may be experiencing homelessness or nonsupportive homes? [8:26 p.m.]
Q4: How can we support students to be their authentic selves? [8:34 p.m.]
Q5: This question is just for LGBTQ+ folx: How has your journey to self-acceptance and self-love been? How does it transform who you are as a teacher? [8:42 p.m.]
Q6: What are you doing in the classroom to ensure you’re always learning and able to support LGBTQ+ students? [8:50 p.m.]
We hope to see you there! Be sure to join us by using #NCTEchat.
Never participated in a Twitter chat before? Check out this guide to help you get started.

Exploring Possibilities for Summer Learning through NEH Institutes

This post was written by NCTE member Kathy G. Short and guest authors Carol Brochin and Leah Durán.
 
The National Endowment for Humanities has long been a rich source of professional learning for NCTE members. These opportunities are being revisioned due to the current pandemic. This summer, many K–12 institutes are available to teachers across the US as virtual seminars that include video tours of museums, virtual interactions with scholars, small group discussions in breakout rooms, immersion in digital archives, and innovative uses of technology.
Spending full days in live virtual interactions would be an overload and would be difficult across time zones, so most institutes are planning to be live four to five hours a day and then provide time for independent research, reading, and viewing of videos and digital archives.

NEH recognizes the professionalism of K–12 teachers by providing a stipend for attending the institutes along with packets of materials and books. Those interested in exploring opportunities for this summer can go to the NEH website for information. Applications for all institutes are due March 1, 2021. 

Our institute, We the People: Migrant Waves in the Making of America, challenges the perception that migration is a recent negative phenomenon. This two-week K–12 virtual institute explores the continuous waves of migration in the US through a case study of Arizona, the last continental state added to the union.
We are particularly concerned with the stories often left out of traditional narratives of US history, which are usually rooted in the thirteen colonies and so erase the experiences of Black, Indigenous, Latinx and other communities of color. Through interactions with narratives, authors, scholars, and museums, our goal is for educators to gain knowledge and strategies to support their classroom teaching by using the inquiry strategies from the case study to research migrant waves in their own states.
During our institute, we will meet on Zoom for four hours a day for interactions with scholars and authors, along with discussions of children’s and young adult books and scholarly readings. We will also work asynchronously on digital archives, video museum tours, and interactions with text sets of children’s and young adult books. We are drawing extensively from Worlds of Words, a Center of Global Literacies and Literatures, in the College of Education, University of Arizona.
The Center provides rich resources of fiction and nonfiction children’s and young adult books and supports interactions with books through literature discussions and browsing of text sets. The advantage of the virtual format is that we can invite the authors of these books to join us for interactions as well as have our own discussions.
Tucson is geographically unique due to its proximity to the Tohono O’odham Nation and the US-Mexico border, and offers a wealth of cultural centers, including the Dunbar Pavilion African American Arts and Cultural Center, the Tohono O’odham Cultural Center, the Jewish History Museum, the San Xavier Mission, and the Arizona State Museum. We are working to access these rich resources through video tours and interactions with digital archives.
Because Arizona became a state in 1912, its historical timeline stands in contrast to traditional depictions of US history. Our work is organized across time periods to highlight the contributions of underrepresented groups in Arizona history and to consider how these time periods relate to the states of participants, for example, original Indigenous inhabitants, migrants as European settlers in territories, diverse communities in the early years of statehood, and recent migrants from other US states and the world. This story is more complex in Arizona due to our history as part of New Spain and Mexico and our positioning on the borderland. The central focus surrounding this institute is an understanding that migration is a constant characteristic of our history, not an anomaly, and has contributed to rich resources within each state.

Our institute is also grounded in the importance of educators learning how to research and weigh evidence within the humanities as they explore historical content and fictional narratives. Our goal is that educators leave the institute with resources and literature along with lived experiences and research strategies as a basis for planning curriculum.

We invite those of you who have attended NEH institutes in the past to share your experiences by sending comments to [email protected] Responses may be considered for inclusion in a future blog post. 

Kathy G. Short is a professor of Teaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studies with an expertise in children’s and adolescent literature and is Director of Worlds of Words: Center of Global Literacies and Literatures.

Carol Brochin is an associate professor of Teaching, Learning, and Sociocultural Studies focusing on bilingual and multicultural teacher preparation and having taught in middle and high school literature classrooms.

Leah Durán is an assistant professor of Teaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studies, who taught in elementary ESL and bilingual classrooms and teaches courses on children’s literature, language development and literacy instruction.

Find Worlds of Words on Twitter at WorldsOfWords.
It is the policy of NCTE in all publications, including the Literacy & NCTE blog, to provide a forum for the open discussion of ideas concerning the content and the teaching of English and the language arts. Publicity accorded to any particular point of view does not imply endorsement by the Executive Committee, the Board of Directors, or the membership at large, except in announcements of policy, where such endorsement is clearly specified. 

Today is Benjamin Franklin’s Birthday

Statesman Benjamin Franklin was born on January 17, 1706, and is well known as one of the leading founders and …
The post Today is Benjamin Franklin’s Birthday appeared first on NCTE.

Get Ready for #AARI21 with #NCTEchat!

Join us on Sunday, January 17, at 8:00 p.m. ET for an #NCTEchat about preparing for the 2021 National African American Read-In. Your host will be Michelle Rankins (@MichelleRankins). Michelle is an NCTE Ambassador and the organizer of Cuyahoga Community College’s seventh annual AARI event, My Sister’s Keeper: Celebrating Black Women and Womxn Poets.
We will share the following questions during the Twitter chat:
Warm-up: During #BlackHistoryMonth, we celebrate the African American Read-In, which aims to bring Black authors into the canons of our communities. Share your favorite quote from an African American author. #NCTEchat #AARI21 [8:04 p.m.]
Q1: How can you help students engage with writings by Black authors in ways that honor the Black community? #AARI21 #NCTEchat [8:10 p.m.]
Q2: What types of interactive reading or writing activities do you have planned for your students during #BlackHistoryMonth? #AARI21 #NCTEchat [8:18 p.m.]
Q3: Have you hosted an African American Read-In event before? If so, what tips can you offer? If not, what questions do you have about hosting a Read-In event? #AARI21 #NCTEchat [8:26 p.m.]
Q4: How are you planning to move your #AARI21 celebration online and to be virtual? Let’s crowdsource ideas for our colleagues who need help! #NCTEchat [8:34 p.m.]
Q5: Representation matters. How do you select texts written by Black authors to ensure that many voices are represented in your classroom? #AARI21 #NCTEchat [8:42 p.m.]
Q6: To understand the current political climate in the US, what Black authors are you reading? Please share titles and links. #AARI21 #NCTEchat [8:50 p.m.]
We hope to see you there! Be sure to join us by using #NCTEchat.
Never participated in a Twitter chat before? Check out this guide to help you get started.