National Summer Learning Week

National Summer Learning Week is a celebration dedicated to “elevating the importance of keeping kids learning, safe, and healthy every summer, ensuring they return to school ready to succeed in the year.” This year National Summer Learning Week is July 12–16, 2021.
While many of the activities and suggestions for National Summer Learning Week are geared towards students, educators and other adults can also benefit from refreshing in the summer. Here are some suggestions based on the themes for this week:

Dive into a Book Adventure
Spend time this summer reading books for pleasure and if there is room, also read professionally.

Eat Healthy and Grow Strong to Win at Wellness
A story and a batch of cornbread created classroom community for Brent Peters and his students at Fernville High School in Louisville, Kentucky. Read his narrative “My Food Lit Class ‘Smells Like Corn’” in the September 2017 Council Chronicle. Read the recipe, shared by Brent’s wife, Emily!

Make a Masterpiece
A Symphony of Possibilities: A Handbook for Arts Integration in Secondary English Language Arts explores arts-based pedagogies for secondary teachers of English language arts. Drama, music, poetry, public art, and visual art are explored in detail by experts in their fields sharing proven methods of instruction with secondary students and teachers. Learn more about “Choosing Creativity as a Lifestyle.”

How will you mark National Summer Learning Week?

It is the policy of NCTE in all publications, including the Literacy & NCTE blog, to provide a forum for the open discussion of ideas concerning the content and the teaching of English and the language arts. Publicity accorded to any particular point of view does not imply endorsement by the Executive Committee, the Board of Directors, the staff, or the membership at large, except in announcements of policy, where such endorsement is clearly specified. 

June 2021 #NCTEchat: Cultivating Powerful Writing Communities

Join us on Sunday, June 20, at 8:00 p.m. ET for an #NCTEchat in which we discuss cultivating powerful writing communities, hosted by past Donald H. Graves Award Winners and Leaders of the Elementary Section Steering Committee (ESSC).
We will share the following questions during the Twitter chat:
WARM-UP: Please introduce yourself and share a word or two to describe the role of writing in your life. #NCTEchat [8:04 p.m.]
Q1: In what ways has writing been a part of antiracist activism historically? #NCTEchat [8:10 p.m.]
Q2: How does writing support antiracist activism today? #NCTEchat [8:18 p.m.]
Q3: The Donald Graves Award is given by the ESSC to recognize K–6 teachers who support children’s writing in transformative ways. How is or how could writing be a transformative tool in your classroom? #NCTEchat [8:26 p.m.]
Q4: Using sensitive writing workshops, which included a declaration of trust, choice, and respect for privacy/safety, @TianaSilvas witnessed the power of storytelling in children’s lives. How do you use writing to help create safe spaces for children? #NCTEchat [8:34 p.m.]
Q5: What matters most to you right now about the possibilities held in the intersection of writing and antiracist pedagogy? #NCTEchat  [8:42 p.m.]
Q6: Effective writing teachers read and write themselves! What examples of writing—particularly from women and BIPOC—have inspired you and supported your ability to teach writing? #NCTEchat [8:50 p.m.]
We hope to see you there! Be sure to join us by using #NCTEchat.
Never participated in a Twitter chat before? Check out this guide to help you get started.

Live Education Events Are Back. But if They Host It, Will You Come?

After a grueling and prolonged pandemic, the days of stacked education conference calendars spanning the globe and events pulling in thousands of attendees might almost seem like a relic of bygone era. Yet recently, a light at the end of the tunnel has flickered into view. Fourteen months after lockdowns and seemingly endless uncertainty sent … Read more

May 2021 #NCTEchat: The Power and Possibilities of Inquiry-Based Instruction

Join us on Sunday, May 16, at 8:00 p.m. ET for an #NCTEchat in which we explore the power and possibilities of inquiry-based instruction. 
NCTE members Sean Ruday (@SeanRuday) and Katie Caprino (@KCapLiteracy) will host the chat.
We will share the following questions during the Twitter chat:
WARM-UP: What comes to mind when you hear the term inquiry-based instruction? #NCTEchat [8:04 p.m.]
Q1: How do you incorporate inquiry-based instruction into your classroom? #NCTEchat [8:10 p.m.]
Q2: How can inquiry-based instruction facilitate authentic learning? #NCTEchat [8:18 p.m.]
Q3: In what ways does inquiry-based instruction permit interdisciplinary learning? #NCTEchat [8:26 p.m.]
Q4: What are the challenges of inquiry-based instruction in your classroom? #NCTEchat [8:34 p.m.]
Q5: Why is inquiry-based instruction important at this particular moment in education? #NCTEchat  [8:42 p.m.]
Q6: What are some ways that you would like to incorporate inquiry-based instruction in your classroom in the future? #NCTEchat [8:50 p.m.]
We hope to see you there! Be sure to join us by using #NCTEchat.
Never participated in a Twitter chat before? Check out this guide to help you get started.

Webinar: 4 Easy Ways To Promote Critical Thinking In Your Classroom

4 Easy Ways To Promote Critical Thinking In Your Classroom Join us for a quick 30 minute webinar on easy ways to integrate critical thinking in your classroom. Critical Thinking When Tuesday, April 27 at 4:30 Eastern US Where This free event is hosted by TeachThought University. You can pre-register here. Outcome Webinar viewers will … Read more

April 2021 #NCTEchat: Celebrating 25 Years of Children’s Day, Book Day

Join us on Sunday, April 18, at 8:00 p.m. ET for an #NCTEchat where we celebrate the 25th anniversary of Children’s Day, Book Day. 
Founded by author and poet Pat Mora, Children’s Day, Book Day is a year-long commitment celebrating the importance of bookjoy. It was inspired by the Mexican traditional holiday El día del niño (the day of the child). Mora thought, “We have Mother’s Day and Father’s Day. We need kids’ day too, but I want to connect all children with bookjoy, the pleasure of reading.”
NCTE members Denise Dávila (@ddavila_atx) and Tracey Flores (@traceyhabla) will host the chat.
We will share the following questions during the Twitter chat:
WARM-UP: Please introduce yourself by telling us your location and role. Share a photo of a text that brought you #bookjoy as a child or teen. #NCTEchat [8:04 p.m.]
Q1: Children’s Day, Book Day is April 30. Have you celebrated this day in the past? If so, what tips can you offer to those planning a Children’s Day, Book Day #bookjoy celebration (virtually or in person)? If not, what ideas do you have for future celebrations? #NCTEchat [8:10 p.m.]
Q2: Children’s Day, Book Day is often called Día to emphasize the importance of daily reading. How do you foster #bookjoy every day? #NCTEchat [8:18 p.m.]
Q3: How do you engage families and communities in promoting a love of reading? #NCTEchat [8:26 p.m.]
Q4: What strategies do you have for sharing readings and incorporating storytelling in our current digital environment? #NCTEchat [8:34 p.m.]
Q5: What professional texts have you been reading that correspond with #bookjoy? #NCTEchat  [8:42 p.m.]
Q6: Share any book that you have recently read and/or are currently reading and why you would recommend it to others. #bookjoy #NCTEchat [8:50 p.m.]
We hope to see you there! Be sure to join us by using #NCTEchat.
Never participated in a Twitter chat before? Check out this guide to help you get started.

Webinar: Teacher Mental Health In The Elementary Classroom

Webinar Event: April 14 at 9 a.m. Eastern U.S. Seating is limited so register now. Title: Teacher Mental Health: Proactive Remedies For The Elementary Classroom Teacher Register Now Date: April 14 at 9 a.m. Eastern US Presenter: Donald Perras, Ph.D Duration: 60 mins Cost: Free Topics: Teacher mental health manifestations, internal and external mental health … Read more

National Library Week 2021

National Library Week begins today and spans April 4–10, 2021. The theme for National Library Week 2021 is “Welcome to Your Library” and promotes the idea that libraries extend far beyond the four walls of a building—and that everyone is welcome to use their services.
During the pandemic, libraries have been going above and beyond to adapt to the changing world by expanding their resources and continuing to meet the needs of their users. Whether patrons visit in person or virtually, libraries offer opportunities for everyone to explore new worlds and become their best selves through access to technology, multimedia content, and educational programs.
How can you celebrate National Library Week?

Use the library’s online resources: The online services that libraries have made readily available allow users to continue supporting libraries.
Support your local library on social media: If you can’t make it to your library, visit their website or social media pages to learn about programs and services offered.
Reread your favorite books: Inventory the books you have access to and reread a beloved text. If you’ve got so many you can’t keep track, consider an app that lets you keep track and share your favorite reads, like Goodreads, LibraryThing, or Litsy. 
Running out of space in your home bookshelves? Use your library as a resource for browsing and sampling new books before you commit to adding them to your personal library.

How do you plan to celebrate National Library Week?
It is the policy of NCTE in all publications, including the Literacy & NCTE blog, to provide a forum for the open discussion of ideas concerning the content and the teaching of English and the language arts. Publicity accorded to any particular point of view does not imply endorsement by the Executive Committee, the Board of Directors, the staff, or the membership at large, except in announcements of policy, where such endorsement is clearly specified.

March 2021 #NCTEchat: Tooling a “Good Generation” as 21st-Century Problem Solvers

Join us on Sunday, March 21, at 8:00 p.m. ET for an #NCTEchat about creating a “Good Generation” as 21st-century problem solvers, hosted by members of the NCTE Standing Committee on Global Citizenship.
Special thanks to committee members Mary Fahrenbruck @Marylovesbooks3, Danielle Filipiak @flipster33, Kylowna Moton @EnglishMajorRu1, and Michael Seward @unreconstituted.
The March #NCTEchat was inspired by a conversation with policy advisor Simon Anholt @SimonAnholt last month. Read more at https://ncte.org/rsvp-simon-anholt/. 
We will share the following questions during the Twitter chat:
WARM-UP: Please introduce yourself. Tell us your name, location, and the level you teach. #NCTEchat [8:04 p.m.]
Q1: @SimonAnholt posits that education is the solution to the world’s challenges, including climate change, extremism, pollution, racism, corruption, violence, poverty, and inequality. Do you agree or disagree? Why? [8:10 p.m.]
Q2: @SimonAnholt highlights that globalization necessitates an acknowledgment that we are living in an interconnected and interdependent world. How do we invite opportunities for students to both experience and understand the power of this interconnection? Share resources. #NCTEchat [8:18 p.m.]
Q3: What are young people teaching us, right now, about what it means to be better stewards of the world? Are we creating spaces that allow their perspectives to be centered? [8:26 p.m.]
Q4: @SimonAnholt suggests that collaboration will be a central skill. How have you taught the skills of collaboration and created student experiences in the classroom to subvert the expectation that schools ought to reinforce competition at the expense of collaboration? #NCTEchat [8:34 p.m.]
Q5: What is one action educators worldwide can take up today to help create and sustain a “Good Generation?” #NCTEchat  [8:42 p.m.]
Q6: What’s one takeaway from tonight’s chat that you’re going to investigate further tomorrow? [8:50 p.m.]
We hope to see you there! Be sure to join us by using #NCTEchat.
Never participated in a Twitter chat before? Check out this guide to help you get started.

March is Women’s History Month

Since 1911, International Women’s Day has been commemorated across the world on March 8th. This is a global day celebrating the economic, political, and social achievements of women past, present, and future. Every US President has marked March as Women’s History Month since 1995.
Women’s History Month honors and celebrates the struggles and achievements of American women throughout the history of the United States. Consider integrating resources and teaching ideas for Women’s History Month from the Library of Congress, with a focus on primary sources.
“Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators and Cartoonists” is an exhibition that highlights little-known contributions made by North American women to two popular art forms—illustration and cartooning. While these fields are traditionally dominated by men, many women have long been creating art intended for reproduction and dissemination in newspapers, periodicals, and books. Learn more in this online exhibition.
The Travel Where Women Made History website introduces current travelers and hope-to-be travelers to a wide range of historic places associated with women’s history. All of the places on this site are in national parks or are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Use the interactive StoryMaps to discover places with women’s history connections all across the country, or check out a Trip Idea and spend a day exploring. 
The blog post “Hidden Figures of Women’s History” from this featured article highlights “hidden figures” of history—women who broke barriers, accomplished great things, or led bold and fascinating lives in eras of limited opportunity for women. They include artists and athletes, reformers and rebels, explorers, journalists, and scientists.
This compilation of blog posts features primary sources on various topics and easy to implement teaching ideas.
How do you plan to recognize Women’s History Month?
Curious about the NCTE and Library of Congress connection? Through a grant announced recently by NCTE Executive Director Emily Kirkpatrick, NCTE is engaged in new ongoing work with the Library of Congress, and “will connect the ELA community with the Library of Congress to expand the use of primary sources in teaching.” Stay tuned for more throughout the year!
It is the policy of NCTE in all publications, including the Literacy & NCTE blog, to provide a forum for the open discussion of ideas concerning the content and the teaching of English and the language arts. Publicity accorded to any particular point of view does not imply endorsement by the Executive Committee, the Board of Directors, the staff, or the membership at large, except in announcements of policy, where such endorsement is clearly specified.