2020 High Hopes Project Report

Pyramid Lake, Nevada on the right, Lake Tahoe in upper left from about 27,000 meters (90,000 feet). Note the thin blue line of Earth’s atmosphere and the dark of space above. Despite weather and other conditions that delayed the 2020 launch of the High Hopes Balloon for weeks we successfully launched June 16th. The flight … Read more

What you know, What you can do, and What you have the potential to do

Many parents default to aptitude tests to help their children determine a career path that suits their abilities and interests. The problem with aptitude tests, however, is that they only measure what someone is innately able to do, regardless of the knowledge they amass or amount of practice they put in. In today’s world of … Read more

How can we connect more students during this time and/or how should we move forward?

Last week James Kapptie, a middle and high school tech trainer in Wyoming, contacted me about having a conversation on his blog about connecting students during this time. He posted the conversation we collaborated on through a Google Doc on his blog Our Children Are Calling and suggested I post it here as well. So … Read more

High Hopes Project – When we launch you can follow the flight live! Here’s how

Find out more about this project here. Our launch has been delayed until June 5th and maybe not until the following week because of weather conditions. When we launch, a communications payload keeps us in touch with the balloon’s progress. Besides 2 SPOT Trackers that use satellite technology to pinpoint the balloons location once it lands (2 … Read more

High Hopes For Our Students and the World! Free STEM Project

From a past High Hopes mission over 90,000 feet above Nevada. That’s Lake Tahoe on the left. At this altitude the balloon is in “near space” above 98% of the Earth’s atmosphere. Note the thin blue line of the atmosphere and the dark of space above. We’re launching the world’s “High Hopes” to the edge … Read more

NETWORKING PART I: Overview

A running joke amongst my teams, mentees, and employees is that I know “everyone”. While that isn’t actually true, I do know many people. Part of this can be chalked up to age – I’ve had many years to meet lots of and lots of people. But much of my connecting know-how stems from a … Read more

NETWORKING PART II: Ground Rules

Networking is most efficient and rewarding when you follow a few rules and maintain protocol. Cultivate networks Your network is a living, breathing organism that should be nurtured. You need to “give” just as much as you “take” but that doesn’t mean that the pattern of engagement has to be one-for-one. There may be long … Read more

NETWORKING PART III: What to Expect

When building your network, keep in mind some pointers to maximize effectiveness. Know who’s on your team A network should be like a botanical garden, with different species and varieties that make the whole organism valuable and interesting. In much the same way, you should also know the types of relationships within your team. KC … Read more

NETWORKING PART IV: How to Become a Valuable Network Member

When giving back to a network, also try to have a plan. The best way to learn to enjoy networking is to not think of it as transactional. Instead, focus on observing and reflecting on your interactions – learning about others’ experiences, celebrating their victories, appreciating their back stories. Over time, this approach will help … Read more

Goodbye Letter for the End of the Year

The end of the year is bittersweet for teachers! Here is a sweet and sincere goodbye letter for the teacher to give to students.
This free, printable letter is a nice way to say happy summer by reminding each student how special they are.
It’s a simple way to end the school year by printing a letter, adding a student’s name and signing it.

Do you ever find it tough to say goodbye to your students? Some years it can be tougher than others, but this editable goodbye letter makes it a little easier.
Print off one of the letters (or multiple ones to give students different borders) and sign each one. Address each letter to a student.
It’s a nice way to say goodbye that ends with, “In all of the things we did, but most of all remember… you’re a very special kid!”
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