16 Ways to Teach Students How to Find Their Way Around the School Campus

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Are you looking ways to teach students how to find their way around the school campus? If so, keep reading.

1. Get the learner to create instructions for discovering places in the school building.

2. Let the learner move from one place to another in the school building only at specific times (e.g., if the learner has difficulty discovering places in the school building when other students are in the halls, let the learner move from one place to another when others are not present.)

3. Get the learner to move from one place to another with a group of students until they develop the capacity and ability to find the places independently.

4. Get the learner to find several landmarks throughout the school building that can help in discovering various places in the school building.

5. Make sure the learner is paying attention to the source of information (e.g., eye contact is being made, hands are free of learning materials, etc.) when instructions to specific places in the school building are given.

6. Get the learner to review instructions before leaving the classroom to find specific points throughout the school building (e.g., have the learner repeat instructions back to you, or have the learner look at a map, etc.).

7. On occasions where giving the learner instructions to specific points throughout the school building, use concrete clues such as the drinking fountain, restrooms, lunchroom. (e.g., say, “Go to the room that is just past the lunchroom, ” or “The bathroom is on the left side of the drinking fountain.” )

8. Teach the learner instruction-following skills (e.g., stop doing other things, listen carefully, write down essential points, wait until all instructions are given, question any instructions not grasped, etc.).

9. Utilize images, diagrams, the smartboard, and gestures when delivering information.

10. On occasions where delivering instructions, explanations, and information, be specific and use vocabulary that is within the learner’s level of comprehension.

11. Assess the appropriateness of the task to ascertain (a) if the task is too easy, (b) if the task is too complicated, and (c) if the duration of time scheduled to finish the task is sufficient.

12. Connect with parents (e.g., notes home, phone calls, etc.) to disseminate information about the learner’s progress. The parents may reinforce the learner at home for discovering appropriate places in the school.

13. Draft an agreement with the learner stipulating what behavior is required (e.g., going to and from the restroom in a sensible amount of time) and what reinforcement will be available when the terms of the agreement have been met.

14. Praise those students in the classroom who demonstrate the capacity and ability to find appropriate places in the school building.

15. Converse with the learner to explain (a) what the learner is doing wrong and (b) what the learner should be doing.

16. Praise the learner for demonstrating the capacity and ability to find appropriate places in the school building : (a) give the learner a concrete reward (e.g., privileges such as leading the line, handing out learning materials, 10 minutes of free time, etc.), or (b) give the learner an informal reward (e.g., praise, handshake, smile, etc.).

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